Sustaining HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis Services: Leveraging Third-Party Reimbursement

By Liisa M. Randall, Consultant and Amy Killelea, Senior Manager, Health Care Access, NASTAD

Medical Bills by http://www.flickr.com/photos/attercop311/With federal and state funding for HIV/AIDS and viral hepatitis services increasingly constrained, it is essential that health departments explore alternative sources of support to ensure the sustainability of vital services. Full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides new opportunities for health departments and implementing partners to leverage resources made available through third-party reimbursement. Please visit NASTAD’s health reform website for resources on what the ACA means for HIV/AIDS and viral hepatitis programs and services, and how health departments are preparing for reform. Continue reading

The Public Health Approach to Ending HIV Criminalization

by Oscar Mairena, Manager, Policy and Legislative Affairs and Viral Hepatitis

Oscar Mairena, Manager, Policy and Legislative Affairs and Viral Hepatitis

Oscar Mairena, Manager, Policy and Legislative Affairs and Viral Hepatitis

On December 4, NASTAD joined the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Center for HIV Law and Policy (CHLP), in collaboration with Congresswoman Barbara Lee, for the United States National Dialogue on the Criminalization of HIV Transmission, Exposure & Non-disclosure: The Role of States & the Federal Government. NASTAD presented on the public health approach to ending HIV criminalization and NASTAD Chair Randy Mayer, Chief of the Iowa Bureau of HIV, STD and Hepatitis joined Iowa State Senator Matt McCoy in discussing the importance of the partnership between the state legislature and public health to modernize HIV criminal policies in Iowa.
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CDC Releases New Data on HIV Cases in the U.S.

By Julie Scofield, Executive Director, NASTAD

Julie Scofield, Executive Director, NASTAD

Julie Scofield, Executive Director, NASTAD

This afternoon, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released an HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report: Estimated HIV Incidence among Adults and Adolescents in the United States, 2007 – 2010. These estimates, based on data collected from 18 states, two cities and the District of Columbia, indicate that new infections of HIV remain stable at 50,000 new infections per year. However, there are a couple of notable differences by sub-group. HIV incidence has decreased among women, particularly Black/African American women and women who were infected through heterosexual contact. HIV incidence has increased among men who have sex with men (MSM) over all and particularly in the 13–24 age category. Young Black/African American MSM accounted for more than half of the new infections among MSM aged 13–24. Continue reading