NASTAD Supports Implementation of Information System Across Ethiopia

By Tibebe Shenie, Country Director, NASTAD Ethiopia and Anne Sites, Senior Manager, Global Program, NASTAD

Wubshet Denboba

Wubshet Denboba, Health System Strengthening Senior Specialist, NASTAD Ethiopia

The recently released UNAIDS Gap Report highlighted many significant achievements in the global fight against HIV/AIDS, including a 13% decrease in new HIV infections and a 19% reduction in AIDS-related deaths over the past three years. But the report also emphasized that much work remains to be done to ‘close the gap’ between those who have access to life-saving services and those who do not. It is critical that Ministries of Health be able to utilize high quality HIV data to address these gaps, and to direct client-level interventions to locations and populations with the greatest need. In Ethiopia, NASTAD is contributing to this effort as it supports the Federal HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control Office (FHAPCO) in the implementation of a Multi-Sectoral Response Information System (MRIS).

Continue reading

“We were able to save ourselves and help others.” A Community-Based Approach to ART Adherence in Ethiopia

By Tibebe Shenie, Country Director, NASTAD Ethiopia; Anne Sites, Senior Manager, Global Program, NASTAD; Alan Lifson, University of Minnesota and NASTAD Consultant

Produced by Ben Lifson, Lead Editor; Deborah Dillaway, Videography; Alan Lifson, Producer

Map of Ethiopia

Ethiopia

Arba Minch is a rural town in the foothills of the Rift Valley in the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Region (SNNPR) of Ethiopia. In addition to the town, many people live in the surrounding villages, supporting themselves through farming and fishing. In SNNPR, the prevalence of HIV among adults is estimated at 1.5%. The Ethiopian government has made a strong commitment to provision of life-saving antiretroviral therapy (ART), with 249,174 adults and 16,000 children receiving ART as of 2012. However, among those enrolling in HIV care, approximately 25% were no longer retained in care after one year.

Continue reading