AIDS Drug Assistance Programs Support New ACA Coverage Options for Thousands of People Living with HIV

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 16, 2014
Contact: Meico Whitlock, 202-434-8094, www.NASTAD.org

AIDS Drug Assistance Programs Support New ACA Coverage Options for Thousands of People Living with HIV

State Health Departments Navigate ACA Enrollment Challenges While Strengthening Insurance Purchasing Infrastructure and Addressing Unmet Need

 Washington, DC – Today, the National Alliance of State

ADAP Clients, June 2013 (Provided by the Kaiser Family Foundation)

ADAP Clients, June 2013 (Provided by the Kaiser Family Foundation)

and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) released new data emphasizing the essential role the Ryan White Program, specifically the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP), plays for people living with HIV (PLWH), including those who have insurance and those who are uninsured. During the inaugural open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), ADAPs transitioned over 25,000 clients to new coverage options. This represents a significant portion of the estimated 56,000 previously uninsured Ryan White clients.[1]

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“We were able to save ourselves and help others.” A Community-Based Approach to ART Adherence in Ethiopia

By Tibebe Shenie, Country Director, NASTAD Ethiopia; Anne Sites, Senior Manager, Global Program, NASTAD; Alan Lifson, University of Minnesota and NASTAD Consultant

Produced by Ben Lifson, Lead Editor; Deborah Dillaway, Videography; Alan Lifson, Producer

Map of Ethiopia

Ethiopia

Arba Minch is a rural town in the foothills of the Rift Valley in the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Region (SNNPR) of Ethiopia. In addition to the town, many people live in the surrounding villages, supporting themselves through farming and fishing. In SNNPR, the prevalence of HIV among adults is estimated at 1.5%. The Ethiopian government has made a strong commitment to provision of life-saving antiretroviral therapy (ART), with 249,174 adults and 16,000 children receiving ART as of 2012. However, among those enrolling in HIV care, approximately 25% were no longer retained in care after one year.

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One Year of HIV Case-based Surveillance in Guyana: Celebrating Successes and Recognizing Challenges

By Anna Carroll, Senior Associate, Global Program, NASTAD

Sunil and Homechand are both HIV Volunteer Counseling and Testing (VCT) counselors in the Berbice region of Guyana, one of the more developed and populated regions in the country. Despite major funding challenges in the region, Sunil and Homechand continue to demonstrate their commitment to combatting the epidemic and improving the health of the Berbice population, testing between 70 and 100 people each month for HIV.       Continue reading

ACA Turns Four: Recognizing Successes and Looking Ahead

By Xavior Robinson, Senior Manager, Health Care Access, NASTAD

Signing of the ACAMarch 23 marked the fourth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). While it is undeniable that the ACA’s inaugural open enrollment period has had its share of challenges, it is important to recognize that the movement to ensure that all Americans have equitable access to health care transcends the technology failures of HealthCare.gov. Over the past four years, state HIV/AIDS programs have worked to adapt and innovate to meet needs of people living with HIV and co-occurring conditions in our evolving health care landscape. Through the use of innovative solutions (see Raising the Bars), support from colleagues and staff, and an enduring commitment to the broader public health imperative presented by HIV, state AIDS directors have leveraged the ACA to achieve remarkable results, including: Continue reading

Share Knowledge and Take Action: National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

By Michelle Allen, Associate, Policy and Legislative Affairs, NASTAD

National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day LogoToday, NASTAD joins in the observation of National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWGHAAD) to recognize the impact of HIV on women and girls across the country. Since 2006, this day has been observed to raise awareness and encourage communities to take action in the fight against HIV/AIDS. The facts are clear, of the 50,000 adults and adolescents newly diagnosed with HIV in 2011, one in five was female. Among women, women of color account for nearly two-thirds of new AIDS diagnoses, and at some point in their lifetimes, 1 in 32 Black women and 1 in 106 Latinas will be diagnosed with HIV. Most of these women, roughly 86%, were infected with HIV by having condomless, heterosexual sex. Educating women, across all communities is an important piece of preventing further spread of the epidemic, and that makes this year’s theme, “Share Knowledge. Take Action,” that much more important. Continue reading