Collaborating with Health Departments to Address the Needs of Native American Transgender Communities

By Lynne Greabell, Director of Member Service and Leadership Development, NASTAD

 Resources for Health Departments Working with Native American Communities

It is important for health departments that have a significant population of Native Americans to address the risk of HIV, STDs and viral hepatitis among Native transgender people. The risk for HIV infection among Native transgender people is evidenced by the fact that higher percentages of Native American GLBTQ youth report high-risk behavior among all youth, that the impacts of co-occurring factors that contribute to HIV risk such as suicides, substance use/abuse and other STDs are higher among Native Transgender people, and that 75% of HIV infections among Native American men were among men who have sex with men (MSM) in 2011.

How One Health Department is Working with the Transgender Community: A Case Study in Montana

By Laurie Kops, STD/HIV Section Supervisor, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services

Laurie Kops, STD/HIV Section Supervisor, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services

Laurie Kops, STD/HIV Section Supervisor, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services

It would be fair to say that many in Montana, including those in public and private health agencies, would be quite stunned to realize the significant number of transgender, gender-nonconforming, and gender-variant individuals living in this vast state, even though we are not able to accurately quantify this demographic. As populations that are under-recognized, underserved, stigmatized and at risk for HIV and STD infection, it is imperative that support, services and understanding be generously and vigorously offered.

The Montana HIV Planning Group (HPG) has been a champion in many areas. The group has been a progressive, integrated (HIV prevention, HIV treatment, STD prevention and Hepatitis prevention) HPG for years, and has provided thoughtful consideration during the myriad of changes in HIV prevention interventions and services. In addition, HPG members have been a voice in local communities against stigma and discrimination, and, most recently, agreed that it is vital to examine the health needs of the transgender, gender-nonconforming, and gender-variant populations. Continue reading

When You Are Not Counted, You Don’t Count

By JoAnne Keatley, MSW, Director and Co-Principal Investigator, Center of Excellence for Transgender Health at the University of California San Francisco

JoAnne Keatley, MSW, Director and Co-Principal Investigator, Center of Excellence for Transgender Health at the University of California San Francisco

JoAnne Keatley, MSW, Director and Co-Principal Investigator, Center of Excellence for Transgender Health at the University of California San Francisco

November has been designated as the National Transgender Awareness Month in order to raise awareness of issues that affect the transgender (trans) community. November 20th is the National Transgender Remembrance Day, an opportunity for the trans community and its allies to stand up against the lack of legal and workplace protection from discrimination and the transphobic violence that threatens daily life. For example, trans youth are harassed and bullied in schools or worse. In Oakland, my own backyard, a 16 year old was set on fire on a municipal bus traveling home from school merely for being their authentic self, because they were assigned a male sex at birth and had dared to wear a skirt and use gender neutral pronouns. This is terrible, heart breaking, and tragic.

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