Is $1 Enough for Viral Hepatitis Prevention?

By Emily McCloskey, Manager, Policy and Legislative Affairs

Is 1$ Enough for Viral Hepatitis Prevention?Today, NASTAD released an infographic analyzing viral hepatitis funding. State health departments receive less than $1 dollar in federal funding for every person living with viral hepatitis for the Viral Hepatitis Prevention Coordinator (VHPC) program. The VHPC program is the only national program dedicated to the viral hepatitis epidemics and provides the only public health infrastructure for the prevention of viral hepatitis and linking individuals to care and treatment. In order to meet the goals established by the Viral Hepatitis Action Plan, the VHPC program must continue to be funded in all existing jurisdictions and increased resources are necessary to coordinate prevention efforts at the state and local levels. Continue reading

How Health Departments Are Modernizing HIV Prevention with Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

By Christopher Cannon, Manager, Health Care Access, NASTAD

PrEPPrior to the approval of Truvada as PrEP, health departments feared there would be a rush of affluent gay men demanding access to Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)-the use of antiretroviral medication to prevent the infection of HIV-to abandon condom use altogether. In so doing, they would create greater health disparities among vulnerable populations like young gay and bisexual men, Black and Latino gay and bisexual men, and transgender women who are often disenfranchised. However interest in PrEP outside of clinical trials across the country has been very limited. Gilead, manufacturer of Truvada, reports only 2,319 prescriptions filled for Truvada as PrEP from January 1, 2012 (prior to FDA approval in July 2012) to September 30, 2013 in the United States, which currently has an estimated 50,000 HIV infections each year. Continue reading

NASTAD and NCSD Launch New Survey to Monitor Stigma Impacting Black and Latino Gay Men and MSM

June 16, 2014 – This month, as part of on-going efforts to explore and address community- and institution-level stigma impacting Black and Latino gay men and MSM within public health practice, the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) and the National Coalition of STD Directors (NCSD) are re-launching an updated survey assessment to continue efforts to monitor stigma in public health practice. Through support from the MAC AIDS Fund, NASTAD and NCSD conducted a three-year study of stigma and its impact on public health practice for Black and Latino gay men/MSM. This work included a national survey of more than 1,300 respondents; the convening of a Blue Ribbon Panel of stakeholders and medical providers; the publication of “Optimal Care Checklists” for providers and for Black and Latino gay male patients; and the convening of a National Stigma Summit on Black and Latino Gay Men’s Health. Continue reading

NASTAD and NCSD Launch Stigma Toolkit for Black and Latino Gay Men


Stigma ToolkitJune 11, 2014
– The National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) and the National Coalition of STD Directors (NCSD) are launching “Addressing Stigma: A Blueprint for HIV/STD Prevention and Care Outcomes for Black and Latino Gay Men.” The blueprint contains 17 recommendations for reducing public health stigma that prevents Black and Latino gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) from receiving optimal health care. Health departments will receive four courtesy copies via mail to distribute across programs (i.e., HIV prevention and care, STD programs).

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Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS in Higher Education Institutions in Ethiopia

The content of this post originally appeared in The Roll Out, a Newsletter of CDC-Ethiopia and Partners, in December 2013.

Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS in Higher Education Institutions

The Roll Out, a Newsletter of CDC-Ethiopia and Partners

Since the issue of HIV/AIDS was brought forward as one of the major health challenges of Ethiopia, lots of public and private organizations, including higher education institutions (HEI) in the country have been responding to it in many different ways. The interventions in most of these HEIs are characterized by sidelined, on the fringe activities with lack of coordination and sustainability. As HIV/AIDS continues to be a threat and constitutes a big problem among colleges and universities in Ethiopia, there is a need for comprehensive, prompt and sustainable programming. Mainstreaming brings HIV/AIDS to the center of these organizations’ agendas along with the core activities, integrating it into the main objectives of the institutions.

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